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Siyclone

SIYEED

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  1. SIYEED

    NFL: Philly vs. Atl

    that game was on point last night. Mike Vick ain't playin
  2. That's tight, cuz I know it couldn't have been me
  3. That site is tight. I'm going to email this out
  4. I put a sticky in The Bar so everyone will know that the threads are here
  5. Following is a list of some of the aid offered by governments. -- Sri Lanka has offered what it called a "token contribution" of $25,000 through the American Red Cross. -- Mexico has offered $1 million and is sending 15 truckloads of water, food and medical supplies via Texas. The Mexican navy has offered to send two ships, two helicopters and 15 amphibious vehicles. -- Australia is giving A$10 million ($7.6 million), most of it to the American Red Cross. -- China has offered $5 million. -- -- Germany has offered a wide range of assistance including evacuation by air, medical services, transportation services, water treatment capabilities, assistance in searching for victims, vaccination teams and supplies, and emergency shelter. Germany has also said it is ready and willing to "dip into its own emergency oil reserves" to release some 2 million barrels a day for 30 days. -- France has offered mobile help from the French Antilles, which is relatively close to the affected regions, including a civil defense detachment of 35 people, tents, camp beds, generators, motor pumps, water treatment units and emergency kits, two CASA cargo aircraft, a ship (Batral Francis Garnier) and the frigate Ventose with its Panther helicopter, and a hurricane disaster unit (20 soldiers and 900 kg of specialized supplies and medical support). -- France has also offered assistance from the French mainland including: one or two C-135 planes, one A-310 aircraft , and four C-160 Transalls, an airborne emergency unit. In addition, the NGO Telecoms Sans Frontieres, which specializes in restoring phone lines and Internet service in disasters, is ready to send a team of experts and equipment. Veolia Environment, which has facilities in Louisiana, has offered to make its local water management resources available to the American authorities or the Red Cross. It can also quickly send in a team of hydraulic experts. -- Japan has offered to provide $200,000 to the American Red Cross. The government of Japan will identify needs in the affected regions through the U.S. government and, upon request, is ready to provide necessary and available emergency assistance supply amounting to up to $300,000 worth of items such as tents, blankets, power generators, portable water tanks and more from a supply depot maintained by the Japanese government in Florida. -- Cuba's President Fidel Castro said on Friday his nation was ready to send 1,100 doctors and 26 tons of medicine and equipment. Asia AUSTRALIA: "We're going to provide A$10 million ($7.6 million) and the bulk of that money, if not all of it, will go to the American Red Cross," said Australian Foreign Minister Alexander Downer. The Australian government said there may be up to 24 Australians trapped in Louisiana in the aftermath of Katrina. CHINA: China offered $5 million in aid for victims of Hurricane Katrina which devastated the Gulf Coast ahead of President Hu Jintao's U.S. visit. If needed, the Chinese government is also prepared to send rescue workers, including medical experts, officials said. DOMINICAN REPUBLIC: The Dominican Republic offered thousands of military rescue personnel to aid in the rescue and recovery efforts. JAMAICA: Jamaica offered maximum participation in the relief efforts to the United States. JAPAN: Will provide $200,000 to the American Red Cross to assist victims of Hurricane Katrina, the Japanese Foreign Ministry said on Friday. Japan will also identify needs in affected regions via the U.S. government and will provide up to $300,000 in emergency supplies such as tents, blankets and power generators if it receives requests for such assistance, the ministry said. SINGAPORE: The Singapore Armed Forces, responding to requests by the United States Texas Army National Guard, has sent three Chinook helicopters to Fort Polk, Louisiana, to help in relief efforts. The government said the Chinooks will help to ferry supplies and undertake airlift missions. SOUTH KOREA: Has pledged aid and is waiting for a U.S. response, a government official said. "We have sent our intention to offer recovery aid," a Foreign Ministry official said on Friday. SRI LANKA: Will donate $25,000 to the American Red Cross. TAIWAN: Has pledged more than $3 million to the relief effort. Americas CANADA: Offered to help in any way it can and the navy is preparing a ship full of emergency disaster relief supplies to be sent when a request comes. CUBA: Cuban President Fidel Castro offered to fly 1,100 doctors to Houston with 26 tonnes of medicine to treat disaster victims. MEXICO: The country is sending 15 truckloads of water, food and medical supplies via Texas and the Mexican navy has offered to send two ships, two helicopters and 15 amphibious vehicles. VENEZUELA: President Hugo Chavez, a vocal critic of the United States, offered to send cheap fuel, humanitarian aid and relief workers to the disaster area. Europe EUROPEAN UNION: EU countries are ready to give the United States oil if it requests help, EU foreign policy chief Javier Solana said on Friday. But British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said this was not what the EU had in mind when it discussed how to help. FRANCE: Prime Minister Dominique de Villepin said France was ready to offer support, telling TF1 television: "We have rescue teams based in the Caribbean and we are naturally ready to provide aid to the Americans, and that is what we have told them." GERMANY: Has offered mobile units to provide clean water, military hospital facilities and medical aid. ITALY: Has offered to "immediately" send aid and evacuation specialists, Italy's civil protection unit said. Authorities have prepared two military transport planes to fly amphibious vessels, pumps, generators, tents and personnel to New Orleans and other areas. They were awaiting word from U.S. officials, the unit said. NETHERLANDS: Will provide teams for inspecting dykes and for identifying victims if there is a formal request from the United States. It will also send a frigate from Curacao to New Orleans shortly to provide emergency assistance, the government said. RUSSIA: Has offered to help with rescue efforts, but is still awaiting a reply from Washington. "Above all with heavy transport planes, which can be loaded with helicopters and generators -- as there is no electricity in the area of the catastrophe," Defense Minister Sergei Ivanov said. SPAIN: Expects to receive a formal request to release gasoline stocks to the United States and is prepared to grant it, an Industry Ministry spokesman said. SWEDEN: The Rescue Authority said it was on stand-by to supply water purifying equipment, healthcare supplies and emergency shelters if needed. UNITED KINGDOM: British Prime Minister Tony Blair has said Britain stands ready to help the United States in whatever way it can. Middle East SAUDI ARABIA - Saudi Refining, a Houston-based subsidiary of state oil firm Saudi Aramco, will donate $5 million to the American Red Cross to support relief efforts for victims of Hurricane Katrina. CNN State Department Correspondent Andrea Koppel contributed to this report
  6. Saturday, September 3, 2005; Posted: 10:55 p.m. EDT (02:55 GMT) The Carnival Cruise Lines ship 'Holiday' WASHINGTON (Reuters) -- The U.S. government has chartered three luxury cruise liners -- Ecstasy, Sensation and Holiday -- for the next six months to provide temporary housing for victims of Hurricane Katrina, Carnival Cruise Lines said Saturday. Two of the ships, the Ecstasy and Sensation, have a maximum capacity of 2,606 each and will be based in Galveston, Texas, while the third boat, the Holiday, has a maximum capacity of 1,800 and will likely be docked in Mobile, Alabama, the Miami-based company said. Thousands of people in Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama were left homeless after Katrina ripped across the Gulf Coast with powerful winds and widespread flooding, ruining homes, buildings and critical infrastructure. Carnival, which is the namesake brand of the world's largest cruise company, Carnival Corp., declined to say how much the Federal Emergency Management Agency was paying to charter the ships. The company said people who had their trips canceled on the three ships could receive a full refund or book a trip on another cruise ship. Some future travelers are being switched to another boat. It was not immediately clear what would be the total impact on the company by removing three ships from service. Carnival crews will operate the ships which will be at the disposal of the U.S. Military Sealift Command, according to the company. "This inconvenience to our guests will provide desperately needed housing for thousands of individuals affected by this tragedy," said Bob Dickinson, Carnival president and chief executive officer. Carnival shares closed down 28 cents Friday to $48.24 on the New York Stock Exchange.
  7. (CNN) -- The oil-rich nation of Qatar has offered the United States $100 million to assist in the humanitarian crisis triggered by Hurricane Katrina. The state-run Qatar News Agency said Saturday that Qatar's emir, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, decided to contribute that amount for relief "and humanitarian supplies for the victims of this disaster." The U.S. government has received offers of support from dozens of nations across the globe. As of Friday, the White House had not accepted any offers, but Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said the State Department was "working very closely with the Department of Homeland Security to match up what is available with what is needed." There was no immediate word whether the United States would take Qatar up on its offer. Other offers of aid and assistance have come in from countries around the world -- including from India, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Indonesia, the four countries hardest-hit by the December 26 Asian tsunami. The State Department said offers of help had been received from more than 50 countries, including: Australia, Austria, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Belgium, Canada, China, Columbia, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, France, Germany, Guatemala, Greece, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Paraguay, Philippines, Portugal, South Korea, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Slovakia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, United Kingdom, the United Arab Emirates, and Venezuela. International organizations also offered help ranging from medical teams to tents to cash donations. They include NATO, the Organization of American States, the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, and the World Health Organization. The United Nations has offered to help coordinate international relief. State Department officials have not yet said if any of these offers -- beyond specific offers of cash to humanitarian organization -- have been accepted. Following is a list of some of the aid offered by governments. -- Sri Lanka has offered what it called a "token contribution" of $25,000 through the American Red Cross. -- Mexico has offered $1 million and is sending 15 truckloads of water, food and medical supplies via Texas. The Mexican navy has offered to send two ships, two helicopters and 15 amphibious vehicles. -- Australia is giving A$10 million ($7.6 million), most of it to the American Red Cross. -- China has offered $5 million. -- -- Germany has offered a wide range of assistance including evacuation by air, medical services, transportation services, water treatment capabilities, assistance in searching for victims, vaccination teams and supplies, and emergency shelter. Germany has also said it is ready and willing to "dip into its own emergency oil reserves" to release some 2 million barrels a day for 30 days. -- France has offered mobile help from the French Antilles, which is relatively close to the affected regions, including a civil defense detachment of 35 people, tents, camp beds, generators, motor pumps, water treatment units and emergency kits, two CASA cargo aircraft, a ship (Batral Francis Garnier) and the frigate Ventose with its Panther helicopter, and a hurricane disaster unit (20 soldiers and 900 kg of specialized supplies and medical support). -- France has also offered assistance from the French mainland including: one or two C-135 planes, one A-310 aircraft , and four C-160 Transalls, an airborne emergency unit. In addition, the NGO Telecoms Sans Frontieres, which specializes in restoring phone lines and Internet service in disasters, is ready to send a team of experts and equipment. Veolia Environment, which has facilities in Louisiana, has offered to make its local water management resources available to the American authorities or the Red Cross. It can also quickly send in a team of hydraulic experts. -- Japan has offered to provide $200,000 to the American Red Cross. The government of Japan will identify needs in the affected regions through the U.S. government and, upon request, is ready to provide necessary and available emergency assistance supply amounting to up to $300,000 worth of items such as tents, blankets, power generators, portable water tanks and more from a supply depot maintained by the Japanese government in Florida. -- Cuba's President Fidel Castro said on Friday his nation was ready to send 1,100 doctors and 26 tons of medicine and equipment.
  8. Good that's what he gets. 970363[/snapback] :OK!:
  9. Call your local National Guard office. The Salvation Army also picks up donations.
  10. The latest word from city officials is that the D.C. Armory will in fact host up to 400 victims of Hurricane Katrina. At a 1 p.m. press conference, officials announced that the armory would be turned into a temporary shelter. Buses will leave for New Orleans this afternoon, according to the Associated Press. As the Post reported this morning, the city's "mass care" effort would provide victims with food and water, medical attention, counseling and other services. The announcement also means that events scheduled to be held in the armory over the next several weeks -- at least six concerts, a job fair and a Marine Corps Marathon expo -- will likely be canceled in order to accommodate victims. Officials are urging people interested in making monetary donations to call the Red Cross at 1-800-HELP-NOW. To find out how to contribute items locally, call the mayor's call center at (202) 727-1000 or Serve D.C. at (202) 727-7925. Share Our Strength, a non-profit organization of chefs, restaurateurs and other industry professionals fighting hunger, is turning their annual Conference of Leaders in Washington, D.C., into a hurricane relief benefit. Local chef Jeff Tunks of Acadania will be among 40 chefs from across the country preparing southern cuisine in tribute to the Gulf Coast region. Details:$250 per person. 7 to 10 p.m., Monday, Oct 17; National Building Museum; (202) 478-6527 The Urban Style Lab in D.C. will be open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18, offering haircuts on a first come, first served basis. They are charging a flat rate of $45 for men and $75 for women, with proceeds going toward the Red Cross. (202) 223-2066 Collectibles Gallery owner Darlene Mathis is donating 10 percent of sales through Sept. 17 to the American Red Cross. Cady's Alley, 3320 M St. NW, 202.333.5673 The Grog and Tankard will hold a "Singin' the Blues for the Delta" concert to benefit the American Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund on Thursday, Sept. 8. Bands include lower case blues and Jeff Johnston. Doors at 6 p.m., show starts at 8 p.m. 2408 Wisconsin Ave. NW, 202-333-3114.
  11. Bush Says Relief Results 'Not Acceptable' Sep 02 9:22 AM US/Eastern By JENNIFER LOVEN Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON President Bush, facing blistering criticism for his administration's response to Hurricane Katrina, said Friday "the results are not acceptable" and pledged to bolster relief efforts with a personal trip to the Gulf Coast. "We'll get on top of this situation," Bush said, "and we're going to help the people that need help." He spoke on the White House grounds just boarding his presidential helicopter, Marine One, with Homeland Security Department secretary Michael Chertoff to tour the region. The department, which oversees the Federal Emergency Management Agency, has been accused of responding sluggishly to the deadly hurricane. "There's a lot of aid surging toward those who've been affected. Millions of gallons of water. Millions of tons of food. We're making progress about pulling people out of the Superdome," the president said. For the first time, however, he stopped defending his administration's response and criticized it. "A lot of people are working hard to help those who've been affected. The results are not acceptable," he said. "I'm heading down there right now." Bush hoped that his tour of the hurricane-ravaged states would boost the spirits of increasingly desperate storm victims and their tired rescuers, and his visit was aimed at tamping down the ever-angrier criticism that he has engineered a too-little, too-late response. Four days after Katrina made landfall in southeastern Louisiana, Bush was to get a second, closer look at the devastation wrought by the storm's 145 mph winds and 25-foot storm surge in an area stretching from just west of New Orleans to Pensacola, Fla. In all, there are 90,000 square miles under federal disaster declaration. In Mobile, Ala., the president was to get a briefing on the damage, followed by a helicopter survey of areas along the Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana coasts. He was to walk through hard-hit neighborhoods in Biloxi, Miss. But Bush was avoiding an in-person visit to the worst areas of New Orleans, mostly drowned in rank floodwaters and descending in many areas into lawlessness as desperate residents await rescue or even just food and water. Instead, the president was taking an aerial tour of the city and making an appearance at the airport several miles from the center of town. Friday's trip follows a 35-minute flyover of the region he took Wednesday aboard Air Force One. as he headed back to Washington from his Texas ranch. While the president was working his way along the coast, his wife, Laura, was scheduled to be nearby in Lafayette, La. Mrs. Bush was to visit the Cajundome arena to console people who took shelter there. Amid the lowest approval ratings of his presidency, Bush has other problems besides the hurricane: Gasoline prices have soared past $3 a gallon in some places, and support is ebbing for the war in Iraq. So Bush has tried to respond to Katrina in a way that evokes the national goodwill he cultivated after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks _ and that does not recall the criticism his father, former President Bush, endured after Hurricane Andrew slammed Florida in 1992. But he began facing questions about his leadership in the crisis almost immediately. New Orleans officials, in particular, were enraged about what they said was a slow federal response. "They don't have a clue what's going on down there," Mayor Ray Nagin told WWL-AM Thursday night. Seeking to deflect the criticism, Michael Brown, director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, asserted earlier Friday: "In this catastrophic event, everything that we had pre-positioned and ready to go became overwhelmed immediately after the storm." Though he cut his August stay at his Texas ranch short by two days to return to Washington, some said that Bush should not have waited until two days after the storm hit to do so. The president and his aides have repeatedly rattled off specifics about the massive federal response effort under way, from Bush's personal donation to the number of tarps delivered to a $10.5 billion request in emergency aid from Congress to the 28,000 troops sent to the region to help with security and rescues. Some people say the federal government could do more, or do it more quickly, if so many National Guard troops hadn't been sent to Iraq. Also, there already are questions about funding for the Army Corps of Engineers' part in managing the levees that protected New Orleans, especially given years of warnings that the network of barriers was inadequate for the largest storms. The White House on Thursday made available top Corps officials to assure reporters that cuts to the agency's budget did not cause the Katrina disaster. Even though the administration has chronically cut back on the Corps' own requests for funding _ including two key New Orleans-area projects _ White House officials trumpeted the administration's support for the Corps. "Flood control has been a priority of this administration from Day One," McClellan said.
  12. Source: ABC News Website www.abcnews.go.com Corporations Pledge Aid: Sept. 1, 2005 — Several corporations are pledging financial support toward the Hurricane Katrina relief and rebuilding efforts, in light of the widespread devastation left in the storm's wake. The following is a breakdown of the donations: Abbott Laboratories: $2 million, plus at least $2 million in nutritional and medical products BP Amoco PLC: $1 million to the American Red Cross and an employee matching program, which matches contributions greater than $25 until the end of September. Anheuser-Busch: More than 825,000 cans of water. BellSouth: Will match employee and retiree contributions up to $1 million. Chevron Corporation: $3 million contribution to the American Red Cross and $2 million to local charities and relief efforts. Citigroup: $3 million. Culligan International: Five truckloads of water to residents of Alabama and Mississippi. El Du Pont de Nemours & Co.: $1 million. Eli Lilly & Co.: At least $1 million to the American Red Cross, and plans to send 40,000 vials of insulin to patients in the Southeast. Exxon Mobil Corp.: $2 million. General Electric Co.: $1 million. Gave $500,000 to Red Cross earlier this year for general disaster assistance. Will also match employee contributions, which is at least $150,000. NBC, a GE company, also is hosting a disaster relief telethon. Has also offered assistance to FEMA and the Red Cross in the form of equipment and other resources. General Motors Corp.: $400,000. Also, 25 cars and trucks to the American Red Cross. The Home Depot and the Home Depot Foundation: $1.5 million to relief and rebuilding efforts. J.P. Morgan Chase Co.: $3 million. Johnson & Johnson: $250,000 worth of kits containing toothbrushes, soap and shampoo, plus pallets of pain relievers and wound care supplies. Kellogg Co.: Seven truckloads of crackers and cookies. Merck Co. Inc.: $1 million. Will send antibiotics and hepatitis A vaccines, and also match employee contributions beginning Sept. 6. Merrill Lynch: $1 million. Morgan Stanley: Matching employee contributions up to $500,000. Nissan North America: Fifty trucks to the Mississippi Emergency Management Agency. Office Depot: $1 million to the American Red Cross, plus the contents of five New Orleans stores, valued at up to $4 million, to the local relief effort. Oracle: Matching employee contributions. Pfizer Inc.: $2 million. May also donate expertise of medical professionals and supplies once assessment is complete. Qwest Communications International: $230,000 to American Red Cross to help train responders, plus 2,000 long-distance calling cards. Sprint Nextel Corp.: Three thousand walkie-talkie-type phones for emergency personnel. State Farm Insurance: $1 million. United Airlines: Will give 500 flyer miles to anyone who donates at least $50 through United Air. Valero: $1 million. Also donating fuel trucks, food, supplies, etc. Verizon Communications: Company will donate double the amount employees contribute to the Red Cross. Wal-Mart: $1 million to the Salvation Army. The Walt Disney Company: (ABC News' parent company): $2.5 million to the relief and rebuilding efforts — $1 million to the American Red Cross, $1 million to rebuilding efforts targeted at children's charities and the remaining $500,000 to volunteer centers. Wyeth: Will donate antibiotics and nonprescription pain relievers.
  13. This little boy lost everything, and they took his dog At the back end of the line, people jammed against police barricades in the rain. Refugees passed out and had to be lifted hand-over-hand overhead to medics. Pets were not allowed on the bus, and when a police officer confiscated a little boy's dog, the child cried until he vomited. "Snowball, snowball," he cried.
  14. ...and apparently children too
  15. what did u think they where? 965740[/snapback]
  16. was that mother and daughter black???
  17. The Hurricane Katrina disaster has displaced families across the Gulf Coast region. In cooperation with Reach Media Inc., The Tom Joyner Morning Show and BlackAmericaWeb.com, the BlackAmericaWeb.com Relief Fund will accept donations to provide resources to support families who are assisting those displaced by Hurricane Katrina. These funds will go to individual families who have opened their homes to families displaced by Hurricane Katrina, to supplement their personal households as the recovery efforts continue. When you make your donation, you can be confident that your contribution will go to families that are in need of assistance. You can make an online donation by going to www.blackamericaweb.com/relief, by mail at: BlackAmericaWeb.com Relief Fund PO Box 803209 Dallas, TX 75240 The BlackAmericaWeb.com Relief Fund is working cooperatively with churches in states neighboring affected areas to identify households in need of assistance. If you know of a family in need, you can also go to www.blackamericaweb.com/relief to get more information about how to receive relief assistance. The BlackAmericaWeb.com Relief Fund is committed to delivering relief to families in need and will ensure that the dollars donated to the fund get to the families who need them.
  18. Anderson Cooper is going off on the Senator. He said a body was being eaten by rats in the street today.
  19. Does anyone have pictures of the damage to the convention center???
  20. Who, about what, DETAILS 963843[/snapback] The governor of mississippi and the anchorman (I can't think of his name) 963960[/snapback] um, okkkkkkkkkkkk, what about?
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